With the arrival of Disneys hit animated movie Finding Dory a welcome return character is Nemo the clownfish who was the star of Disneys first instalment, Finding Nemo. Alongside Dory the blue tang, clownfish, known for their predominantly striped orange and white appearance, have become amongst the most recognisable species…

NEMO RETURNS WITH DORY – ONE OF THE HITS OF THE LIVING REEF

With the arrival of Disney’s hit animated movie Finding Dory a welcome return character is Nemo the clownfish who was the star of Disney’s first instalment, Finding Nemo.

Alongside Dory the blue tang, clownfish, known for their predominantly striped orange and white appearance, have become amongst the most recognisable species associated with both The Great Barrier Reef and Daydream Island itself. 

Daydream has a population of clownfish in its Living Reef lagoons around the resort. Similar species can also be spotted whilst snorkelling or diving off Daydream’s fringing coral reef. 

Nemoville is a section of The Living Reef which is home to several varieties of clownfish living amongst the anemones. It’s a great way for guests to see them up close in their natural environment.

The clownfish and the anemone have formed a symbiotic relationship whereby the clownfish provides the anemone with nutrients in the form of waste, cleaning the anemone, and scaring away predatory fish such as butterfly fish. In return, the anemone provides the clownfish a safe and protected home. Clownfish don’t try to nibble the nutrient rich tentacles of the anemone and have a resistance to any possible stings in the form of a mucus layer that protects them.

Daydream Island’s Living Reef manager and resident marine biologist John Gaskell said,

“This relationship is truly one of the wonders of the marine world, where each of these species lives  harmoniously with the other for mutual benefit.
“You can see this relationship up close in our own lagoons.”

Daydream’s on-island Living Reef attraction is one of the world’s largest man-made living coral reef lagoons, home to more than 140 species of marine fish, 82 species of coral and 15 species of invertebrates such as starfish, sea cucumbers and crabs.


Comprising a north and south lagoon and holding more than 1.5 million litres of water, the Living Reef lets visitors learn about and get up close to the fascinating inhabitants of the Great Barrier Reef.

There’s no other island quite like Daydream, on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. With a fringing reef a mere flipper’s kick from the beach and a Living Reef on the island itself, it’s an incredible place to not only live and learn about one of the world’s greatest natural wonders, but to experience it first hand.

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